EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION EXPLORATORY WORKSHOP

EARLY SYMBOLIC SYSTEMS FOR COMMUNICATION
IN SOUTHEASTERN EUROPE


KARLOVO, BULGARIA, 14-20 APRIL 2002, SUMMARIES
EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION

PREHISTORY FOUNDATION
Earlier Chalkolithic Ornamentation on the Pottery from Dzhuljunitsa Tell
(North Central Bulgaria)

Rumen Peykov
Veliko Turnovo University, Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria
rumenemo@yahoo.com

    
The Dzhuljunitsa Tell (Veliko Turnovo District, North Central Bulgaria)1 was excavated under the direction of P. Stanev in 1983-1984. A 5.50 m thick cultural layer was documented and distinguished into nine settlement levels (horizons), without stratigraphic hiatus between them. The uppermost three levels (the 7th – 9th) date from Late Chalkolithic, while the lower six – from the so-called Middle and Early Chalkolithic (or earlier Chalkolithic).
     According to the technique of ornamentation, the pottery belongs to seven groups: 1. Graphite painted; 2. Incised; 3. Excised (“Kerbschnitt”); 4. Pricked; 5. Relief; 6. Grooved; 7. Combined (7.1. Graphite and relief; 7.2. Incised and relief; 7.3. Incised and pricked).
     In the light of the recent evidence, 69 motifs characterize the excavated ceramic material. It is worth mentioning the classification and typology is based on very fragmented material. Accordingly, motifs but not compositions can be reconstructed. The only one ornamental composition known from Dzhuljunitsa Tell decorates a storage vessel.

    
The graphite ornaments have close analogies in the pottery from the Polyanitsa culture in Northeast Bulgaria, the Maritsa culture in Thrace, while some motifs are typologically similar with those from the Struma valley.
     The next two groups of ornamentation (incised and excised) characterize the thick-walled pottery. Their closest analogies are located in Boian culture (Vidra and Spantov phases) in Muntenia, and Polyanitsa in Northeast Bulgaria. Its distribution in Northeast and North Central Bulgaria is connected by the researchers with Boian culture influence.
     The motifs of the last four groups also have close analogies in the upper mentioned areas. But they do not very such strong chronological and ethno-cultural characteristics and accordingly have been not analyzed in detail.
     The conclusion of the analysis of the ornamentation is that the ceramic complexes from the lower levels of Dzhuljanitsa Tell are very close to the Boian culture ceramic style. This analysis confirms the already argued thesis that Boian and Polyanitsa ceramic styles are similar typologically. It can be assumed that this similarity was a result not (or not only) of direct contacts of the population from the three regions (Muntenia, Central and Northeast Bulgaria), but because of the fact that all they belong to one culture complex that included direct and indirect active interactions and common tendencies of development.
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2002 © European Science Foundation
2002 © Prehistory Foundation & Reports of Prehistoric Research Projects
2002 ©The Author
Editor: Lolita Nikolova
All rights reserved. Published: 12/21/02
Since 12/21/02